Trump at Mt. Rushmore

Trump’s finest speech — and a press that beclowns itself in boiling hate

President Trump delivered the speech of his presidency at Mount Rushmore Friday, a magnificent affirmation to Americans on their 244th national birthday that what they have always cherished is still cherished, along with a warning shot to those who hate and despise all the United States stands for.  It was non-partisan — there was no mention of Democrats or Joe Biden.  It was inclusive — celebratory of people of all races, and celebratory in particular of the singularity of America being great for such diversity.  It was also big-hearted, magnanimous, celebrating all the range of achievements of the country.  Yet it also did the thing Trump does best, which is to call out and identify authentic enemies, stating that he knows who they are, what their game is, and that he won’t let them win.  In this era, that was necessary shadow.

Trump began by restating the entire meaning of the holiday:

Our founders launched not only a revolution in government, but a revolution in the pursuit of justice, equality, liberty, and prosperity. No nation has done more to advance the human condition than the United States of America and no people have done more to promote human progress than the citizens of our great nation. It was all made possible by the courage of 56 patriots who gathered in Philadelphia 244 years ago and signed the Declaration of Independence. They enshrined a divine truth that changed the world forever when they said, “All men are created equal.” These immortal words set in motion the unstoppable march of freedom. Our founders boldly declared that we are all endowed with the same divine rights, given us by our Creator in Heaven, and that which God has given us, we will allow no one ever to take away ever.

He then delved into an especially wonderful appreciation of America’s presidents on Mount Rushmore, the memory of which has apparently grown so forgotten in the wokester educational world that it became fresh and new as Trump spoke of it, beginning with George Washington:

Before these figures were immortalized in stone, they were American giants in full flesh and blood, gallant men, whose intrepid deeds unleashed the greatest leap of human advancement the world has ever known. Tonight I will tell you and most importantly the youth of our nation the true stories of these great, great men. From head to toe George Washington represented the strength, grace, and dignity of the American people. From a small volunteer force of citizen farmers, he created the Continental Army out of nothing and rallied them to stand against the most powerful military on earth. Through eight long years, through the brutal winter at Valley Forge, through setback after setback on the field of battle, he led those patriots to ultimate triumph. When the army had dwindled to a few thousand men at Christmas of 1776, when defeat seemed absolutely certain, he took what remained of his forces on a daring nighttime crossing of the Delaware River. They marched through nine miles of frigid darkness, many without boots on their feet, leaving a trail of blood in the snow. In the morning, they seized victory at Trenton after forcing the surrender of the most powerful empire on the planet at Yorktown, General Washington did not claim power but simply returned to Mount Vernon as a private citizen.

When called upon again, he presided over the Constitutional Convention in Philadelphia and was unanimously elected our first president. When he stepped down after two terms, his former adversary, King George called him the greatest man of the age. He remains first in our hearts to this day, for as long as Americans love this land, we will honor and cherish the father of our country, George Washington. He will never be removed, abolished, and most of all, he will never be forgotten. 

Since this sort of thing is no longer taught in schools, it was a stellar reminder.  Yet he didn’t stop at the four presidents depicted — he did what he always does, which is celebrate the heroic people from all walks of life — Clara Barton, the Tuskegee Airmen, Wild Bill Hickok, Alan Shepard, Elvis Presley, Harriet Tubman — an amazing and wonderful array.

Even the mild NeverTrumps, such as Rich Lowry, were impressed.